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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 2 ( September-December, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

To evaluate and compare the Effectiveness of Sensorimotor Integration with that of Conventional Training for improving Balance and Gait in Stroke Hemiparesis: A Comparative Study

Anjali Jain

Citation Information : Jain A. To evaluate and compare the Effectiveness of Sensorimotor Integration with that of Conventional Training for improving Balance and Gait in Stroke Hemiparesis: A Comparative Study. J Mahatma Gandhi Univ Med Sci Tech 2016; 1 (2):47-54.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10057-0012

Published Online: 01-12-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim of the study

To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of sensorimotor integration with that of conventional training for improving balance and gait in stroke hemiparesis.

Materials and methods

The study design used for this research will be comparative study. Data will be taken from Mahatma Gandhi Hospital and Medical College, Jaipur and Mumbai.

Results

When both the groups were compared using unpaired t-test, sensorimotor group showed significant improvement in all outcome measures (p < 0.0001) except for MCTSIAB conditions 1 and 2 where the difference was not statistically significant.

Conclusion

Sensorimotor integration training is one of the novel treatment which can have a addictive effects along with the conventional training for balance.

How to cite this article

Agarwal G, Jain A. To evaluate and compare the Effectiveness of Sensorimotor Integration with that of Conventional Training for improving Balance and Gait in Stroke Hemiparesis: A Comparative Study. J Mahatma Gandhi Univ Med Sci Tech 2016;1(2):47-54.


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